Who to Include in Your Office Redesign Process.

Research by the National Center for the Middle Market in partnership with The Novo Group found that nearly 80 percent of middle market companies see the overall quality of facilities and the working environment as important to creating a compelling employee value proposition. The right office design will help make your business run better.

Once you have decided on updating your office, which may stem from the necessity to cut costs, reduce your carbon footprint, or make your workspace more technology friendly, you will need to find an organized way to keep everyone engaged and passionate about what they do in the new space.

To that end, you should involve employees in deciding how the space will look and feel. Their involvement in decision-making gives them a voice in something meaningful, which, as Boundless points out, increases engagement and improves performance.

Who to include in your office redesign:

Start with the professionals. In planning out your redesign, reach out to an office design and logistics professional who can assist you with all phases of the process – logistics and moving, design, furniture purchase and installation. A professional design firm that can help you handle all the details will ultimately save you time and money.

Human resources. Get together with the people who will be working in the space to work out the logistics and get their input on the space redesign. This should not only include employees who will be working in the space, but also IT specialists who will be running cable and installing wireless routers, as well as the facilities management of the building.

Extroverts and Introverts. Recognize that although the work day may comprise many different types of tasks performed by many different generations working together, you’re really only dealing with two main personality types: Extroverts and introverts. Extroverts get their energy from being around a multitude of people, while introverts charge their batteries with quiet time and reducing external stimuli.

Extroverts thrive on social situations, so common areas in design for office space are ideal for them. They also appreciate smart collaboration with smart tech.

Introverts need to be left alone to recharge in order to be productive. They appreciate designs that include individual pods, nap rooms, huddle spaces that can accommodate one or two people max, and soundproofed walls.

Max Chopovsky, the founder of Chicago Creative Space, a firm that helps companies create thriving office cultures through design, believes that business leaders focus so much on what has worked for others that they don’t spend enough time thinking about the particular needs of their own employee base. “There’s no secret sauce that’s applicable to every company out there,” Chopovsky says. “Companies always say they want Google’s space and culture, but that’s all wrong. They shouldn’t strive to be anyone else; they should strive to be themselves. A smarter solution is for business leaders to devote time to carefully observing the behaviors of their workers before making any major decisions.”

If your office space redesign is planned out carefully and designed with your employees in mind, your new office will be a prove to be a victory. If you need help or inspiration, contact us and we will be happy to give you advice and ideas on how to make your office move and redesign successful.

 

 

Sources
1. https://www.lpsofficeinteriors.com/planning-for-your-office-redesign-5-easy-steps
2. 2. https://www.middlemarketcenter.org/expert-perspectives/involve-employees-in-your-new-office-layout-and-design
3. 3. https://www.inc.com/jeff-pochepan/create-the-ideal-office-for-introverts-and-extroverts.html
4. 4. https://www.fastcompany.com/3046516/designing-offices-where-both-introverts-and-extroverts-can-thrive-2

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